Insecurities

staceythinx:

Evolution of Type, Exhibits 31, 32, 33, 34 by Andreas Scheiger is a series of sculptures “visualizing the birth of the alphabet”.

threadless:

We don’t recommend putting this tee in the microwave, but “Pocket Noodles" by Kris is one of the most appetizing additions to our collection of pocket tees!

Dig into our pocket tees collection!

archatlas:

Creative Retouching ASILE

pinkdrinksandmore:

Cute mushroom cupcakes on We Heart It.

pinkdrinksandmore:

Cute mushroom cupcakes on We Heart It.

huffingtonpost:

Japanese Condom Cookbook Puts Sex Ed On Your Plate
Let’s face it: Condoms are versatile. And while there are many uses for condoms — other than the obvious — here is one we had never considered: using them to make dinner.

huffingtonpost:

Japanese Condom Cookbook Puts Sex Ed On Your Plate

Let’s face it: Condoms are versatile. And while there are many uses for condoms — other than the obvious — here is one we had never considered: using them to make dinner.

wicked-gadgets:

For the Lazypeople.. Self Stirring Mug

wicked-gadgets:

For the Lazypeople.. Self Stirring Mug

huffingtonpost:

See the infographic in full resolution here.
theaatproject:

The Best Language for Math
What’s the best language for learning math? Hint: You’re not reading it.
Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Turkish use simpler number words and express math concepts more clearly than English, making it easier for small children to learn counting and arithmetic, research shows.
The language gap is drawing growing attention amid a push by psychologists and educators to build numeracy in small children—the mathematical equivalent of literacy. Confusing English word names have been linked in several recent studies to weaker counting and arithmetic skills in children. However, researchers are finding some easy ways for parents to level the playing field through games and early practice.

theaatproject:

The Best Language for Math

What’s the best language for learning math? Hint: You’re not reading it.

Chinese, Japanese, Korean and Turkish use simpler number words and express math concepts more clearly than English, making it easier for small children to learn counting and arithmetic, research shows.

The language gap is drawing growing attention amid a push by psychologists and educators to build numeracy in small children—the mathematical equivalent of literacy. Confusing English word names have been linked in several recent studies to weaker counting and arithmetic skills in children. However, researchers are finding some easy ways for parents to level the playing field through games and early practice.

xxxtinydancerxxx:

Too cool not to share!

xxxtinydancerxxx:

Too cool not to share!